A WONDERFUL ANSWER

 

Bob Dylan 2016

 

by

 

Olof Björner

 

A summary of recording & concert activities,

New releases, EXHIBITIONS & books.

 

 

 

© 2017 by Olof Björner

All Rights Reserved.

 

This text may be reproduced, re-transmitted, redistributed and

otherwise propagated at will, provided that this notice remains

intact and in place.


 

1       INTRODUCTION.. 4

2       2016 AT A GLANCE.. 4

3       THE 2016 CALENDAR.. 5

4       NEW RELEASES. 6

4.1       Fallen Angels. 6

4.2       The 1966 Live Recordings. 6

4.2.1       Background. 6

4.2.2       CDs. 7

5       THE NOBEL PRIZE.. 8

5.1       The Announcement 8

5.2       The Presentation Speech. 8

5.3       The Banquet Speech. 9

5.4       The Nobel Lecture. 10

6       THE NEVER-ENDING TOUR CONTINUES. 10

6.1       Introduction. 10

6.2       The musicians. 10

6.3       The show.. 11

6.4       Tour of Japan. 12

6.4.1       Dates and venues. 12

6.4.2       The songs. 14

6.4.3       Statistics. 14

6.4.4       Comments. 15

6.5       US Summer Tour. 15

6.5.1       Dates and venues. 15

6.5.2       The songs. 17

6.5.3       Statistics. 18

6.5.4       Comments. 19

6.6       US Fall Tour. 20

6.6.1       Dates and venues. 20

6.6.2       The songs. 22

6.6.3       Statistics. 25

6.6.4       Comments. 26

6.7       Summary. 27

6.7.1       Song statistics. 27

6.7.2       Show statistics. 27

6.7.3       Album statistics. 27

6.7.4       Alphabetical song list 28

6.7.5       Top Ten songs. 29

6.7.6       Songs played only once. 29

6.7.7       Live debut of a Dylan song. 29

6.7.8       Covers played 2016. 29

7       NEW BOOKS. 30

8       REFERENCES & SOURCES. 32

9       APPENDIX: THE SET-LISTS. 33


1           INTRODUCTION

An important year for Bob Dylan including the announcement of The Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa, Oklahoma, two record releases, Fallen Angels and the mammoth 36-CD Live 1966 Recordings, continued touring, a new exhibition The Beaten Path at The Halcuon Gallery in London and of course the Nobel Prize in Lterature.

 

2           2016 AT A GLANCE

 


3           THE 2016 CALENDAR

10 January

David Bowie dies in New York City at the age of sixtynine,

February

Dylan and the current touring band record 30 new songs associated with Frank Sinatra in Capitol Studio C in Los Angeles.

April

It is announced that Bob Dylan has sold his private archive, said to contain more than 6000 items, to The George Kaiser Family Foundation in Tulsa. Oklahoma. Different parts of The Bob Dylan Archive will be open to visitors in open exhibitions and to students and researchers.

4 April

A 16-date tour in six Japanese cities starts in Tokyo. Same band and pretty much the same set-list as during the last tour.

5 April

The second show features the live premiere of That Old Black Magic. The set.list from this show was repeated during the rest of the tour,

20 May

Fallen Angels, the second album with songs recorded by Frank Sinatra is released. More info in section 4.1.

4-5 June

Dylan resumes The Never Ending Tour with two shows in Woodinville, Washington. The shows structure remins intact and I Could Have Told You, another song associated with Franl Sinatra, is debuted.

28 June

First live performance of How Deep Is The Ocean in Kettering, Ohio

3 July

First live performance of That Old Feeling in Mashantucket, Connecticut

17 July

The US Summer tour ends with a show in Gilford, New Hampshire 

7 October

After taking time off for other activities Bob Dylan resumes touring with a lengthy United States Fall tour. The first and third shows are part of Desert Trip, a two weekends extra-vaganza at the Empire Polo Club in Indio, California. The set is somewhat shorter than usual and is the first concert without “Sinatra-covers” since Los Angeles, California, 25 October 2014. The Rolling Stones opened.

13 October

The Announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature to Bob Dylan, is presented by Professor Sara Danius, Permanent Secretary of the Swedish Academy.

 

Meanwhile Dylan plays in Las Vegas, but fails to acknoeledge the Nobel Prize. In fact he will not do so for another two weeks, causing both astonishment and irritation. The set contains just one Sinatra song this evening

14 October

Another show in Indio, with The Rolling Stones as openinmg act. First live performance of Like A Rolling Stone since Rome, Italy, 6 November 2013.

27 October

The set-list now contains five Sinatra songs.

28 October

Dylan and the band record Once Upon A Time in Birmingham. Alabama, for the NBC special, "Tony Bennett Celebrates 90: The Best Is Yet to Come” broadcast 20 November.

5 November

The exhibition The Beaten Path opens at The Halcuon Gallery in London. A number of paintings, drawings, weatercolours and acrylic works, showing Bon Dylan’s view of the American landscape. 

7 November

Leonard Cohen dies in Los Angeles at the age of eightytwo.

11 November

Release of the 36-CD box The 1966 Live Recordings. For Further details plese see section 4.2.

12 November

Starting with the show in Asheville, North Carolina, the “Sinatra-ratio” is usually 1/3. i.e. 7 songs!

23 November

Last show of the Fall tour is played in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The short intermission after nine songs was abandoned during this tour.

10 December

During the Nobel Prize ceremony in The Stockholm Concert Hall the presentation speech is delivered by Horace Engdahl.  Later during the banquet in Stockholm City Hall Azita Raji, the United States Ambassador to Sweden, reads a speech by Bob Dylan, and Patti Smith sings A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall accompanied by the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra. She is so moved by the occasion that she has to restart the performance in the middle of the first verse and then delivers a magnificient version which draws the longest applause of the evening.

 

4           NEW RELEASES

4.1       Fallen Angels

This album containing another set of songs from 40’ and 50’s was recorded in the famous Studio B in Capitol Recording Studios in Los Angeles, California, at the same occasion as Shadows In The Night. Frank Sinatra once recorded his great Capitol albums in the 50s in this studio.

All songs, except Skylark, were once recorded by Frank Sinatra.

Dylan is accompanied by his regular road band and three horn players on ome of the tracks.

Fallen Angels was released on 20 May 2016. For further details please refer to the session page for February March 2014.

4.2       The 1966 Live Recordings

4.2.1   Background

This release can be seen both as a companion piece to Bootleg Series vol 12. The Cutting Edge and another 50th Anniversary collection to pass these recordings in the public Domain. The release consists of 36-CD box and also a 2 LP vinyl release.

This release was partly like the three previous years, triggered by European copyright laws which would pass these recordings onto public domain unless Sony claims ownership by releasing them one way or another.

Insightful liner notes are written by Clinton Heylon.

 


 

 

4.2.2   CDs

CD #

Location & date

Source

Comment

01-02

Sydney Stadium, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 13 April 1966

TGN

incomplete

03

Festival Hall, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 20 April 1966

TGN

incomplete

04

KB-Hallen, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1 May 1966

*

incomplete

05-06

Adelphi Theatre, Dublin, Ireland, 5 May 1966

N

 

07-08

ABC Theatre, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 6 May 1966

N

incomplete

09-10

Colston Hall, Bristol, England, 10 May 1966

N, A

 

11

Capitol Theatre, Cardiff, Wales, 11 May 1966

N

Electric set only

12-13

Odeon Theatre, Birmingham, England, 12 May 1966

N

incomplete

14

Odeon Theatre, Liverpool, England, 14 May 1966

N

incomplete

15-16

De Montford Hall, Leicester, England, 15 May 1966

N

 

17-18

Gaumont Theatre, Sheffield, England, 16 May 1966

CBS, N

 

19-20

Free Trade Hall, Manchester, England, 17 May 1966

CBS

 

20

Free Trade Hall, Manchester, England, 17 May 1966, Soundcheck

N

 

21

Odeon Theatre, Glasgow, Scotland, 19 May 1966

N

incomplete

22-23

ABC Theatre, Edinburgh, Scotland, 20 May 1966

N

incomplete

24-25

Odeon Theatre, Newcastle, England, 21 May 1966

N

incomplete

26-27

Olympia, Paris, France, 24 May 1966

N

incomplete

28-29

Royal Albert Hall, London, England, 26 May 1966

CBS

 

30-31

Royal Albert Hall, London, England, 27 May 1966

CBS

 

32

Westchester County Center, White Plains, New York, 5 February 1966

A

incomplete

33

Syria Mosque, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 6 February 1966

A

incomplete

34

Island Garden, Hempstead, New York, 26 February 1966

A

incomplete

35

Festival Hall, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 19 April 1966

A

incomplete

36

Konserthuset, Stockholm, Sweden, 29 April 1966

A

incomplete


 

5           THE NOBEL PRIZE

5.1       The Announcement

The Announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature to Bob Dylan, was presented by Professor Sara Danius, Permanent Secretary of the Swedish Academy, on 13 October 2016:

 

“The Nobel Prize in Literature for 2016 is awarded to Bob Dylan for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition".

 

5.2       The Presentation Speech

The presentation speech was delivered by Swedish Academy member Horace Engdahl in the Stoclholm Concert Hall, 10 December.

 

Your Majesties, Your Royal Highnesses, Your Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen,

What brings about the great shifts in the world of literature? Often it is when someone seizes upon a simple, overlooked form, discounted as art in the higher sense, and makes it mutate. Thus, at one point, emerged the modern novel from anecdote and letter, thus arose drama in a new age from high jinx on planks placed on barrels in a marketplace, thus songs in the vernacular dethroned learned Latin poetry, thus too did La Fontaine take animal fables and Hans Christian Andersen fairy tales from the nursery to Parnassian heights. Each time this occurs, our idea of literature changes.

In itself, it ought not to be a sensation that a singer/songwriter now stands recipient of the literary Nobel Prize. In a distant past, all poetry was sung or tunefully recited, poets were rhapsodes, bards, troubadours; 'lyrics' comes from 'lyre'. But what Bob Dylan did was not to return to the Greeks or the Provençals. Instead, he dedicated himself body and soul to 20th century American popular music, the kind played on radio stations and gramophone records for ordinary people, white and black: protest songs, country, blues, early rock, gospel, mainstream music. He listened day and night, testing the stuff on his instruments, trying to learn. But when he started to write similar songs, they came out differently. In his hands, the material changed. From what he discovered in heirloom and scrap, in banal rhyme and quick wit, in curses and pious prayers, sweet nothings and crude jokes, he panned poetry gold, whether on purpose or by accident is irrelevant; all creativity begins in imitation.

Even after fifty years of uninterrupted exposure, we are yet to absorb music's equivalent of the fable's Flying Dutchman. He makes good rhymes, said a critic, explaining greatness. And it is true. His rhyming is an alchemical substance that dissolves contexts to create new ones, scarcely containable by the human brain. It was a shock. With the public expecting poppy folk songs, there stood a young man with a guitar, fusing the languages of the street and the bible into a compound that would have made the end of the world seem a superfluous replay. At the same time, he sang of love with a power of conviction everyone wants to own. All of a sudden, much of the bookish poetry in our world felt anaemic, and the routine song lyrics his colleagues continued to write were like old-fashioned gunpowder following the invention of dynamite. Soon, people stopped comparing him to Woody Guthrie and Hank Williams and turned instead to Blake, Rimbaud, Whitman, Shakespeare.

In the most unlikely setting of all - the commercial gramophone record - he gave back to the language of poetry its elevated style, lost since the Romantics. Not to sing of eternities, but to speak of what was happening around us. As if the oracle of Delphi were reading the evening news.

Recognising that revolution by awarding Bob Dylan the Nobel Prize was a decision that seemed daring only beforehand and already seems obvious. But does he get the prize for upsetting the system of literature? Not really. There is a simpler explanation, one that we share with all those who stand with beating hearts in front of the stage at one of the venues on his never-ending tour, waiting for that magical voice. Chamfort made the observation that when a master such as La Fontaine appears, the hierarchy of genres - the estimation of what is great and small, high and low in literature - is nullified. “What matter the rank of a work when its beauty is of the highest rank?" he wrote. That is the straight answer to the question of how Bob Dylan belongs in literature: as the beauty of his songs is of the highest rank.

By means of his oeuvre, Bob Dylan has changed our idea of what poetry can be and how it can work. He is a singer worthy of a place beside the Greeks' ἀοιδόι, beside Ovid, beside the Romantic visionaries, beside the kings and queens of the Blues, beside the forgotten masters of brilliant standards. If people in the literary world groan, one must remind them that the gods don't write, they dance and they sing. The good wishes of the Swedish Academy follow Mr. Dylan on his way to coming bandstands.

 

5.3       The Banquet Speech

The Banquet speech by Bob Dylan was given by the United States Ambassador to Sweden Azita Raji, at the Nobel Banquet, 10 December 2016.

 

Good evening, everyone. I extend my warmest greetings to the members of the Swedish Academy and to all of the other distinguished guests in attendance tonight.

I'm sorry I can't be with you in person, but please know that I am most definitely with you in spirit and honored to be receiving such a prestigious prize. Being awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature is something I never could have imagined or seen coming. From an early age, I've been familiar with and reading and absorbing the works of those who were deemed worthy of such a distinction: Kipling, Shaw, Thomas Mann, Pearl Buck, Albert Camus, Hemingway. These giants of literature whose works are taught in the schoolroom, housed in libraries around the world and spoken of in reverent tones have always made a deep impression. That I now join the names on such a list is truly beyond words.

I don't know if these men and women ever thought of the Nobel honor for themselves, but I suppose that anyone writing a book, or a poem, or a play anywhere in the world might harbor that secret dream deep down inside. It's probably buried so deep that they don't even know it's there.

If someone had ever told me that I had the slightest chance of winning the Nobel Prize, I would have to think that I'd have about the same odds as standing on the moon. In fact, during the year I was born and for a few years after, there wasn't anyone in the world who was considered good enough to win this Nobel Prize. So, I recognize that I am in very rare company, to say the least.

I was out on the road when I received this surprising news, and it took me more than a few minutes to properly process it. I began to think about William Shakespeare, the great literary figure. I would reckon he thought of himself as a dramatist. The thought that he was writing literature couldn't have entered his head. His words were written for the stage. Meant to be spoken not read. When he was writing Hamlet, I'm sure he was thinking about a lot of different things: "Who're the right actors for these roles?" "How should this be staged?" "Do I really want to set this in Denmark?" His creative vision and ambitions were no doubt at the forefront of his mind, but there were also more mundane matters to consider and deal with. "Is the financing in place?" "Are there enough good seats for my patrons?" "Where am I going to get a human skull?" I would bet that the farthest thing from Shakespeare's mind was the question "Is this literature?"

When I started writing songs as a teenager, and even as I started to achieve some renown for my abilities, my aspirations for these songs only went so far. I thought they could be heard in coffee houses or bars, maybe later in places like Carnegie Hall, the London Palladium. If I was really dreaming big, maybe I could imagine getting to make a record and then hearing my songs on the radio. That was really the big prize in my mind. Making records and hearing your songs on the radio meant that you were reaching a big audience and that you might get to keep doing what you had set out to do.

Well, I've been doing what I set out to do for a long time, now. I've made dozens of records and played thousands of concerts all around the world. But it's my songs that are at the vital center of almost everything I do. They seemed to have found a place in the lives of many people throughout many different cultures and I'm grateful for that.

But there's one thing I must say. As a performer I've played for 50,000 people and I've played for 50 people and I can tell you that it is harder to play for 50 people. 50,000 people have a singular persona, not so with 50. Each person has an individual, separate identity, a world unto themselves. They can perceive things more clearly. Your honesty and how it relates to the depth of your talent is tried. The fact that the Nobel committee is so small is not lost on me.

But, like Shakespeare, I too am often occupied with the pursuit of my creative endeavors and dealing with all aspects of life's mundane matters. "Who are the best musicians for these songs?" "Am I recording in the right studio?" "Is this song in the right key?" Some things never change, even in 400 years.

Not once have I ever had the time to ask myself, "Are my songs literature?"

So, I do thank the Swedish Academy, both for taking the time to consider that very question, and, ultimately, for providing such a wonderful answer.

My best wishes to you all,

Bob Dylan

 

5.4       The Nobel Lecture

Bob Dylan did not attend the Prize Ceremonies or the Nobel Banquet on 10 December 2016 in Stockholm and have not at the time of this writing delivered the Nobel Lecture required to receive the prize money.

 

 

6           THE NEVER-ENDING TOUR CONTINUES

6.1       Introduction

The Never-Ending Tour rolled on with 75 new shows during these three legs:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

April

Tour of Japan

16 shows

June – July

US Summer Tour

30

October – November

US Fall Tour

29

For the first since 1988 there were no shows in Europe.

6.2       The musicians

Charlie Sexton

lead guitar

Donnie Herron

violin, viola, mandolin, pedal steel guitar

Stu Kimball

electric and acoustic guitar, maracas

Tony Garnier

bass

George Recile

drums

6.3       The show

 

Japan

Summer

Fall

Main set:

19 songs

18 songs

16-19 songs

Encores:

2 songs

2 songs

2 songs

 

There was a short intermission between song 9 and 10 in the first set during the first two tours.


 

6.4       Tour of Japan

6.4.1   Dates and venues

 

APRIL

 

  4

Tokyo, Japan 

Bunkamura Orchard Hall, Shibuya

  5

Tokyo, Japan 

Bunkamura Orchard Hall, Shibuya

  6

Tokyo, Japan 

Bunkamura Orchard Hall, Shibuya

  9

Miyagi, Japan 

Tokyo Electron Hall Miyagi

11

Osaka, Japan 

Festival Hall

12

Osaka, Japan 

Festival Hall

13

Osaka, Japan 

Festival Hall

15

Nagoya, Japan 

Century Hall

18

Tokyo, Japan 

Bunkamura Orchard Hall, Shibuya

19

Tokyo, Japan 

Bunkamura Orchard Hall, Shibuya

21

Tokyo, Japan 

Bunkamura Orchard Hall, Shibuya

22

Tokyo, Japan 

Bunkamura Orchard Hall, Shibuya

23

Tokyo, Japan 

Tokyo Dome City Hall

25

Tokyo, Japan 

Bunkamura Orchard Hall, Shibuya

26

Tokyo, Japan 

Bunkamura Orchard Hall, Shibuya

28

Yokohama, Japan 

Pacifico-Yokohama

 

 


6.4.2   The songs

 

There was only two different setlists played during this tour: thr first concert in Tokyo 4 April (A) and the rest of the concerts (B).

 

 

A

B

Things Have Changed

1

1

She Belongs To Me

2

2

Beyond Here Lies Nothin'

3

3

What'll I Do?

4

4

Duquesne Whistle

5

5

Melancholy Mood

6

6

Pay In Blood

7

7

I'm A Fool To Want You

8

8

That Lucky Old Sun

9

 

Tangled Up In Blue

10

10

High Water (For Charley Patton)

11

11

Why Try To Change Me Now?

12

12

Early Roman Kings

13

13

The Night We Called It A Day

14

14

Spirit On The Water

15

15

Scarlet Town

16

16

All Or Nothing At All

17

17

Long And Wasted Years

18

18

Autumn Leaves

19

19

Blowin' In The Wind

20

20

Love Sick

21

21

That Old Black Magic

 

9

6.4.3   Statistics

 

Number of shows

16

Number of circulating shows

16

Number of circulating & complete shows

16

Number of unique shows[1]

2

Number of different shows[2]

       2

Number of songs

22

Number of performed songs

336

Mean number of performed songs

21

Variation[3]:

1.0

 

 

# of

 

# of

 

 

songs

%

perf.

%

Albums

12

54.5

192

 57.1

Singles

1

4.5

16

4.8

Outtakes

0

0.0

0

  0,0

Covers       

9

  41.0

128

  36.1

 

6.4.4   Comments

First live performance of That Old Black Magic in Tokyo 5 April.

There are circulating recordings from all shows.

 

 

6.5       US Summer Tour

6.5.1   Dates and venues

 

JUNE

  

  4

Woodinville, Washington 

Chateau Ampitheatre Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery

  5

Woodinville, Washington 

Chateau Ampitheatre Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery

  7

Eugene, Oregon 

Cuthbert Amphitheater

  9

Berkeley, California 

Greek Theatre, University Of California, Berkeley

10

Berkeley, California 

Greek Theatre, University Of California, Berkeley

11

Santa Barbara, California 

Santa Barbara County Bowl

13

San Diego, California 

Humphreys Concerts By The Bay

14

San Diego, California 

Humphreys Concerts By The Bay

16

Los Angeles, California 

Shrine Auditorium

19

Morrison, Colorado 

Red Rocks Amphitheatre

21

Kansas City, Missouri 

Starlight Theatre

22

Lincoln, Nebraska 

Pinewood Bowl Theater

24

Highland Park, Illinois 

The Pavilion at Ravinia

25

Indianapolis, Indiana 

The Lawn at White River State Park

26

Nashville, Tennessee 

Carl Black Chevy Woods Amphitheater at Fontanel

28

Kettering, Ohio 

Fraze Pavilion

29

Toledo, Ohio 

Amphitheater, Toledo Zoo

30

Lewiston, New York 

Artpark Mainstage

 

JULY

  

  2

Lenox, Massachusetts 

Tanglewood-Koussevitzky Music Shed

  3

Mashantucket, Connecticut 

Grand Theater at Foxwoods Resort Casino

  5

Vienna, Virginia 

Filene Center, Wolf Trap Farm Park For The Performing Arts

  6

Vienna, Virginia 

Filene Center, Wolf Trap Farm Park For The Performing Arts

  8

New York City, New York 

Forest Hills Stadium

  9

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 

Sands Bethlehem Events Center

10

Atlantic City, New Jersey 

Borgata Hotel Casino and Spa Event Center

12

Canandaigua, New York 

Constellation Brands–Marvin Sands Performing Arts Center

13

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Mann Music Center

14

Boston, Massachusetts 

Blue Hills Bank Pavilion

16

Portland, Maine 

Thompson's Point

17

Gilford, New Hampshire 

Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion

 


 


6.5.2   The songs

IN ORDER PLAYED

 

A: 4 – 26 June

B: 28 June – 2 July

C: 3 – 10 July

D: 12 July

E: 13 – 14 July

F: 16 July

G: 17 July

 

 

 

 

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

Things Have Changed

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

30

She Belongs To Me

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

30

Beyond Here Lies Nothin'

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

30

What'll I Do?

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Pay In Blood

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

30

Melancholy Mood

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

30

Duquesne Whistle

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

30

I'm A Fool To Want You

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Tangled Up In Blue

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

30

High Water (For Charley Patton)

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

30

Why Try To Change Me Now?

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

30

Early Roman Kings

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

30

I Could Have Told You

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

30

Spirit On The Water

14

14

14

14

14

14

14

30

Scarlet Town

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

30

All Or Nothing At All

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

30

Long And Wasted Years

17

17

17

17

17

17

17

30

Autumn Leaves

18

18

18

18

18

18

18

30

Blowin' In The Wind

19

19

19

19

19

19

19

30

Love Sick

20

20

20

20

 

 

 

26

The Night We Called It A Day

 

4

4

 

 

4

4

12

How Deep Is The Ocean

 

8

 

8

8

 

8

8

That Old Feeling

 

 

8

 

 

8

 

7

Full Moon And Empty Arms

 

 

 

4

4

 

 

3

Stay With Me

 

 

 

 

20

20

20

4

# of shows

15

4

6

1

2

1

1

30

Total # of songs

300

80

120

20

40

20

20

600

 

 


 

IN SONG ORDER

 

A: 4 – 26 June

B: 28 June – 2 July

C: 3 – 10 July

D: 12 July

E: 13 – 14 July

F: 16 July

G: 17 July

 

 

 

 

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

All Or Nothing At All

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

30

Autumn Leaves

18

18

18

18

18

18

18

30

Beyond Here Lies Nothin'

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

30

Blowin' In The Wind

19

19

19

19

19

19

19

30

Duquesne Whistle

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

30

Early Roman Kings

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

30

Full Moon And Empty Arms

 

 

 

4

4

 

 

3

High Water (For Charley Patton)

10

10

10

10

10

10

10

30

How Deep Is The Ocean

 

8

 

8

8

 

8

8

I Could Have Told You

13

13

13

13

13

13

13

30

I'm A Fool To Want You

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Long And Wasted Years

17

17

17

17

17

17

17

30

Love Sick

20

20

20

20

 

 

 

26

Melancholy Mood

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

30

The Night We Called It A Day

 

4

4

 

 

4

4

12

Pay In Blood

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

30

Scarlet Town

15

15

15

15

15

15

15

30

She Belongs To Me

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

30

Spirit On The Water

14

14

14

14

14

14

14

30

Stay With Me

 

 

 

 

20

20

20

4

Tangled Up In Blue

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

30

That Old Feeling

 

 

8

 

 

8

 

7

Things Have Changed

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

30

What'll I Do?

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

Why Try To Change Me Now?

11

11

11

11

11

11

11

30

# of shows

15

4

6

1

2

1

1

30

Total # of songs

300

80

120

20

40

20

20

600

 

 

6.5.3   Statistics

Shows:

Number of shows

30

Number of circulating shows

24

Number of circulating & complete shows

24

Number of unique shows [4]

4

umber of different shows[5]

4

Number of songs

25

Number of performed songs

600

Mean number of performed songs                   

30

Variation[6]

1,2

 

 

Songs:

 

# of

 

# of

 

 

songs

%

perf.

%

Albums

12

48

356

59.3

Singles

1

4

30

5,0

Outtakes

0

0

0

0.0

Covers

12

48

214

35.7

 

6.5.4   Comments

The same setlist was played:

 

A: 4 – 26 June

15 shows

B: 28 June – 2 July

4 shows

C: 3 – 10 July

6 shows

D: 12 July

1 show

E: 13 – 14 July

2 shows

F: 16 July

1 show

G: 17 July

1 show

 

Recordings from the following shows are not in general circulation:

 

Woodinville, Washington 5 June, Berkeley, California 9 June, Berkeley, California 10 June,

Kansas City, Missouri 21 June, Gilford, Neww Hampshire 17 July.

 

First live performance of

How Deep Is The Ocean in Kettering, Ohio 28 June,

I Could Have Told You in Woodinville, Washington 4 June,

That Old Feeling in Mashantucket, Connecticut 3 July 2016.

6.6       US Fall Tour

6.6.1   Dates and venues

 

OCTOBER

  

  7

Indio, California 

Empire Polo Club

13

Las Vegas, Nevada

The Chelsea, The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas

14

Indio, California 

Empire Polo Club

16

Phoenix, Arizona 

Comerica Theatre

18

Albuquerque, New Mexico 

Kiva Auditorium, Convention Center

19

El Paso, Texas 

Abraham Chavez Theatre

22

Thackerville, Oklahoma 

WinStar World Casino and Resort

23

Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Brady Theater

25

Shreveport, Louisiana 

Municipal Auditorium, Shreveport Civic Center Complex

26

Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

River Center Theater

27

Jackson, Mississippi

Thalia Mara Hall, City Auditorium

29

Huntsville, Alabama 

Mark C. Smith Concert Hall, Von Braun Center

30

Paducah, Kentucky 

Luther F. Carson Four Rivers Center

 

NOVEMBER

  

  1

Louisville, Kentucky 

Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts

  2

Charleston, West Virginia 

Maier Foundation Performance Hall, Clay Center

  4

Durham, North Carolina

Durham Performing Arts Center

  5

Roanoke, Virginia 

Berglund Performing Arts Theatre, Berglund Center

  6

Charlotte, North Carolina 

Belk Theater, Blumenthal Performing Arts Center

  9

Knoxville, Tennessee 

Tennessee Theatre

10

Columbia, South Carolina 

Richland Township Auditorium

12

Asheville, North Carolina 

Thomas Wolfe Auditorium,  U.S. Cellular Center

13

Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Tivoli Theatre

15

Birmingham, Alabama 

Concert Hall, Birmingham Jefferson Convention Centerss

16

Mobile, Alabama 

Saenger Theatre

18

Jacksonville, Florida 

Moran Theater, Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts

19

Clearwater, Florida 

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Richard B. Baumgardner Center for the Performing Arts

20

Fort Myers, Florida 

Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts Hall, Florida Southwestern State College

22

Orlando, Florida 

Dr. Phillips Center

23

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

Au-Rene Theater, Broward Center for the Performing Arts

 

 

 


 


 

6.6.2   The songs

 

Song Charts

 

Songs in order played:

 


 


Songs in alphabetical order:

 

 


 

6.6.3   Statistics

Shows:

Number of shows

29

Number of circulating shows

18

Number of circulating & complete shows

18

Number of unique shows[7]

13

Number of different shows[8]

12

Number of songs

31

Number of performed songs

566

Mean number of performed songs

19

Variation[9]

1.6

 

Songs:

 

# of

 

# of

 

 

songs

%

perf.

%

Albums

23

 74.2

405

71.6

Singles

1

  3.2

26

4.6

Outtakes

0

  0.0

0

  0.0

Covers

7

  22.6

135

  23.8

 

6.6.4   Comments

The following shows are not circulating:

 

Las Vegas 13 October, Albuquerque, New Mexico 18 October, El Paso, Texas 19 October,

Charlotte, North Carolina 6 November, Knoxville, Tennessee 9 November,

Columbia, South Carolina 10 November, Chattanooga, Tennessee 13 November,

Birmingham, Alabama 15 November, Mobile, Alabama 16 November, Fort Myers, Florida 20 November,

Orlando, Florida 22 November,

 

 

 

6.7       Summary

6.7.1   Song statistics

Abbreviations:

es      early songs, 1961-1966                                     80      songs from the 80s

ap      songs from the "amnesia period", 1967-1972     90      songs from the 90s

70      songs from the middle seventies, 1973-1978      00      songs from the current millennium

gp      songs from the "gospel years", 1979-1982         co      covers

 

 

Tot #

 

 

 

 

# of songs from

 

 

 

 

songs

es

ap

70

gp

83-89

90s

00s

co

Tour of Japan

336

32

0

16

0

0

16

144

128

 

 

10%

0%

5%

0%

0%

5%

43%

38%

US Summer Tour

600

60

0

30

0

0

26

270

214

 

 

10%

0%

5%

0%

0%

4%

45%

36%

US Fall Tour

566

140

0

35

0

0

48

208

135

 

 

26%

0%

6%

0%

0%

8%

37%

24%

2016

1502

232

0

81

0

0

90

622

477

 

 

15%

0%

6%

0%

0%

      6%

41%

32%

6.7.2   Show statistics

1. Tour of Japan

2. US Summer Tour

3. US Fall Tour

 

 

1

2

3

S

Number of shows

16

30

29

75

Number of circulating shows

16

21

18

55

Number of circulating & complete shows

16

21

18

55

Number of unique shows

2

4

13

19

Number of different shows

2

4

12

18

Number of songs

22

25

31

39

Number of performed songs

336

600

566

1502

Mean number of performed songs

21

30

19

20

Variation

1.0

1.2

1.6

1.9

6.7.3   Album statistics

 

 

# of

 

# of

 

Album

songs

perf

Freewheelin'

3

  8.6%

103

  7.6%

Bringing It All Back Home

2

  5.7%

65

  4.8%

Highway 61 Revisited

4

 11.4%

61

  4.5%

Blonde On Blonde

1

  2.9%

3

  0.2%

Blood On The Tracks

2